Friday, October 15, 2010

Weaving for the garden and the birds

At the willow weaving class in June I had a chance to  meet a few of the members of the Southwestern Ontario Basketry Guild and it was a wonderful opportunity for me to get to know people with an interest in willow.

One of the girls, Janice joined my friend Frances and me for a couple of days of weaving here at Lakeshore Willows, where Janice and I benefited from Frances' great experience in willow weaving.

We used entirely left over willow from the above mentioned class in June - dried, then soaked willow kept in a freezer by Frances since June - and Frances was happy to see most of the willow finally transformed into something useful.

Both Janice and Frances have added wonderful posts to their blogs about our "Basket Camp" where you can read more about the experience.
This garter snake decided to pay us a visit in the garage. I was very surprised that he actually came right into the garage where we were working on the baskets - AND both dogs were there too. Maybe because it was a very hot day, but I quickly got him outside again - I really don't like snakes, even the harmless ones, and definitely not in the house. Really, since that day I catch myself checking for any movement whenever I step into the garage from the house!
Our finished garden baskets displayed on the deck.
Frances did a great job teaching us the techniques that were a great challenge for both Janice and me - especially to scallom and insert the stakes.
My basket in use - I just harvested the last big bunch of tomatoes a couple of days ago.
Our next project were bird-feeders. Here's Janice working on the base - Frances "lending a helping hand"
Our final products.

I think they look pretty good, considering they were our first attempts, helping each outer and following written instructions.







Words and photos by Lene Rasmussen,Willows.


11 comments:

  1. They look really nice, do you sell the instructions or the bird feeders?

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  2. Thank you Stone Art and Sue - yes, I really think they are nice too.
    I don't sell the instructions for the bird feeders, but I just made a few that will be for sale. If that goes well, I will be making them for sale and take orders for them.
    Lene

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  3. I like the bird feeders, too.

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  4. I've been looking for 'pidgin-proof' bird feeders for a long time, and I think you've found the perfect solution :-) But... the roof isn't waterproof, I think?
    It's pretty necessary in Denmark, but nonetheless I'll look for bird feeders with a design like the one you showed here :-D

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  5. Ellen, you treat the bird feeder with a wood protecting solution - and there is a plywood disc inserted at the bottom of the roof.
    I think there is a lot of people in Denmark selling this style. Take a look at this: http://www.skovflet.dk/index.htm
    Lene

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  6. The bird feeders are amazing! Whether they're practical or not, they would be a great addition to a backyard created for wildlife.

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  7. Thank you, Lorraine! Absolutely, and they are handmade from locally grown (organically) willow!
    Lene

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  8. We enjoyed our 3 days weaving and the bird feeders truly are amazing "in person".

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  9. Hvor er de dog skønne jeres kurve, lige præcis den slags grove kurve, som jeg holder så meget af. Fuglehusene er også vældig sjove.
    Jeg forstår godt, at du er begyndt at checke efter slangebesøget. De få gange vi har set en hugorm i Tranum, har jeg vandret lange omveje for at undgå at skulle igennem græsset hvor de lå og hyggede sig i solen.
    En rigtig god dag til dig.

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  10. Annette, ja "havekurven" er ret grov eller rustik, men meget praktisk netop som havekurv til at samle og transportere dagens høst i.
    Jeg tror bestemt, vi er mange i den slange-fobi klub.
    Lene

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