Monday, November 29, 2010

Salix x 'Flame' flaming in the November sun!

Sometimes you just have to post repeatedly about a subject - like the colours of the willow branches, intensifying after some frosty nights, and amplified by late afternoon sun.
The colours in the field looked so inviting from the house that I decided to walk out and try to capture some of it. Above is Salix x 'Flame' on November 11, 2010 burning in the late afternoon sun.

Salix x rubens 'Hutchinsons Yellow' - true to its name somewhat more yellowish - stunning.

Salix 'Americana' had taken on a beautiful brown colour with a touch of pink.


Interesting enough Salix koriyanagi 'Rubykins' still had all green leaves, standing tall, slim, and beautiful, the rods a bright green with some rosy cheeks.

Time for harvesting has arrived - at least for some varieties.

Words and photos by Lene Rasmussen,Willows.

13 comments:

  1. Hi Salix,

    Our willow fills our lives with colour, we are fortunate to have our seasons.

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  2. What splendid color! How do you time your harvest?

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  3. Weaving Willow, you're so right, my willow friend.
    Lene

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  4. Hello Lanny, yes the colours are soo vibrant.
    You can harvest the willow anytime while it is dormant - so as soon as the leaves have fallen off and until new growth starts.
    Depending on the time available (probably not too much time this side of Christmas?) I can start harvesting willow for drying anytime.
    The willow rods that I plan on using for living willow fences and trees - which I will promote for sale this coming spring - I leave until just before I start working with them.
    Lene

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  5. those Hutchinsons Yellow look fab!

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  6. Stone Art, they are fab, especially when you have a larger group of them in the field or garden.
    Lene

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  7. Wow - I particularly like the willows on the first two pictures - can easily imagine a basket in those amazing colours for collecting mushrooms in the Swedish woods :-)

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  8. Ellen, the willows are still colourful when dried, but most often the colours change a lot when they later are soaked for weaving and then dries up again. It is possible to use rods that are still somewhat fresh for certain weaves. That way you don't soak them again and they will keep more of their colours. I am sure that you can find someone in Denmark who would make you a beautiful mushroom-collecting-basket - or better yet teach you to make your own.
    Lene

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  9. Beautiful colours, Lene. Are you imagining what you might turn them into? Or just enjoying their current form?

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  10. Ha-ha, Janet - for now I am just enjoying looking at them in the field. I am sure though, that they will be transformed into something that I will post about on the blog someday.

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  11. Sikke farver, Lene. Det trængte jeg lige til, når jeg ser ud af vinduet er alt gråt og lidt trist, dog pipper der lidt lyseblåt frem på himmelen i retning Breda, så måske vejrguderne beslutter sig for at indstille regnen.
    Rigtig god høst.

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  12. Annette, ja regn er jo ikke det mest opmuntrende (især ikke på denne årstid). Vi havde regn her hele sidste uge; men nu har vi så fået vintervejr med hård frost og sne (kun en smule sne her, hvor vi bor). Pilens farve skifter med vejret (måske lidt ligesom farven på havet eller fjorden?) men som det står nu, ser det skønt ud mod den hvide sne.
    Lene

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  13. Så underbart vacker färg och den vita snön är perfekt bakgrund. Just nu skulle jag också vilja se lite färg utanför fönstret. Men jag är tacksam för de dagar jag överhuvudtaget kan se ut på grund av alla snöstormar vi har haft här.
    Önskar dig en skön helg!

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